Don’t use the “.nz” domain name after 1st Feb 2019

Please don’t get excited if you have a org.nz, a .co.nz or a dot com domain name. This article is only about using the .nz domain as the primary domain on your website. I own multiple domains, i.e. a .nz domain name, a.co.nz, and a dot com domain name for my business Webdesinz. My primary domain is webdesinz.com.

I am posting to advise any customers that are ONLY using a .nz domain ending on their website, then they may be in trouble, i.e. their website may slow down or go offline. To counteract that, they should buy a new domain name immediately, and it should be anything else but the defunct domain ending.¬† This will also affect people across the globe, for many other domains, because it is more about “the Internet” no longer supporting non-compliant DNS standards.

I suggest get in touch with me at webdesinz.com if your site goes down, or runs slow; and I can assist you to search for a new appropriate domain name, and make that become your primary domain name, (if that is what is found at fault). There is more work involved, than just changing your domain name; you also have to submit the new domain name to google, and a new sitemap and change your GoogleMyBusiness and the rest of your social media pages to inform of the change as well point to the new name.

See this article at https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/110306781/hundreds-not-thousands-of-nz-websites-now-expected-to-fail

The above link does not really cover the full underlying issues about DNS failures – it will also affect other domain names, outside NZ

This latest move is about no longer accommodating  non-compliant DNS from their software or services, from February 1st 2019. This change will affect only sites operating non-compliant software.

Check your own website for compliance here:  https://dnsflagday.net/

The main change is that DNS software from compliant vendors will interpret timeouts as sign of a network or server problem. Starting February 1st, 2019 there will be no attempt to disable EDNS in reaction to a DNS query timeout. This effectively means that all DNS servers which do not respond at all to EDNS queries are going to be treated as dead.